ISA and China Instrument & Control Society (CIS) finalise Memorandum of Cooperation

20/09/2013

Agreement paves the way for numerous collaborative opportunities

Building on its worldwide presence and mission of global collaboration, the International Society of Automation (ISA) has signed a Memorandum of Cooperation (MOM) with the China Instrument & Control Society (CIS), the leading academic organisation in instrumentation, measurement, control and automation in China.

cis

China Instrument and Control Society
Founded in 1979, the nonprofit China Instrument and Control Society (CIS), formerly China Instrument Society, is the leading academic organization in instrumentation, measurement, control and automation in China.With 42,000 individual members, 2100 group members, 41 technical divisions, 29 local sections, and 10 ad hoc committees, CIS publishes six academic and technical journals on measurement and control and instrumentation, and has hosted MICONEX (Multinational Instrumentation Conference and Exhibition) annually since 1983, providing a forum for innovation as well as science and technology awards.
Located in Beijing, China’s capital, CIS operates as a bridge among the Chinese governmental administrations, industries, scientists, engineers, researchers and manufacturers.

While the two organisations have maintained a mutually beneficial bi-lateral relationship since 1980—with both entities regularly supporting and participating in the events and activities of the other—the MOM formally declares joint intentions to:

  • Further the professional interests of automation and control professionals throughout the world.
  • Encourage the exchange and dissemination of technical information.
  • Promote understanding and cooperation between the members of CIS and ISA.

“The signing of this MOC is the result of multiple conversations in recent years between ISA and CIS,” says Patrick Gouhin, ISA Executive Director and CEO.  “We have established a mutual understanding, based on each organization’s strengths and competencies, that allows us to take the relationship to the next level, benefiting all automation professionals around the world through enhanced information sharing.”

Specifically, the agreement outlines several opportunities for collaboration, including:

  • Co-organized automation and control engineering and technical training courses in China.
  • Co-sponsored automation and academic conferences in China, other parts of the Asia-Pacific region, the US and throughout the world.
  • Reciprocal membership, enabling members of both associations to gain membership into the other at a discount.
  • The translation of more ISA publications into Mandarin, and the translation of more CIS publications into English.
  • Greater access to ISA automation and control standards in China.

Peggy-Koons-accepting-plaque-from-CIS

At a recent meeting in Beijing, China, ISA President-elect Secretary Dr Peggie Koon received a plaque from Wu Youhua, Secretary General of the China Instrumentation and Control Society (CIS). The plaque expresses CIS’ appreciation of ISA’s support and contribution to MICONEX (Multinational Instrumentation Conference and Exhibition), the global conference that CIS hosts each year.

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Developing economies’ growth fuels DCS market in Asia.

31/12/2012

The major growth in Distributed Control Systems (DCS) revenues continues to come from developing nations. Growth in countries such as India and China is conspicuous because of sluggish growth rates in other regions of the world. While developed nations are just holding their own (at best) in DCS investments, in developing countries, several recent trends are becoming increasingly important for success in the DCS business. These two countries are undergoing rapid growth and industrialization in Asia. At the time of this report, however, China’s growth is slowing. Even with a slowdown in China, Asia remains a leading growth engine for the global DCS marketplace, representing almost 35 percent of the world market.

ARC expects the top five growth industries in Asia to be oil & gas, mining & metals, cement & glass, water & wastewater, and electric power, in that order, with associated increases in DCS revenues. The growth of these industries is expected to be above average. Demand for oil will continue to increase in the long term despite short-term demand shortfalls. Oil exploration and production is taking the industry into increasingly remote and hostile regions, increasing demand for remote operations and subsea production. The power industry is also growing at a healthy rate over the forecast period. Developing economies, such as India and China, continue to invest in new power capacities and world-class power generation facilities. While pent up demand for mining & metals and cement & glass investments caused sizeable increases from 2010 to 2011, the growth is expected to return to a more moderate level over the forecast period.

ARC Foresees the Robust Growth of DCS in Asia
graph-distributed-control-systems-india-crAccording to ARC Advisory Group’s research, the total distributed control systems market in Asia will exceed $6,300 million in 2016. ARC’s latest study, “Distributed Control Systems for Asia Market Research Study” provides an in-depth analysis of the DCS business in Asia. In addition to market analysis and forecasts, the study also covers the current market nuances, strategic issues, and the future outlook. The report also highlights the factors that influence the DCS market in Asia and its dynamics.

G. Ganapathiraman, Country Manager, ARC Advisory Group, India and co-author of this study says, “The trends that drive the DCS business in Asia vastly differ from those in developed nations. Due to the economic growth in China and India along with the other BRIC countries, investments in infrastructure, oil and gas production, and in refining are rising, leading to increased demand for DCS.”

In 2011, ARC saw a much larger increase in revenue over 2010 than previously anticipated. The order book started improving at the end of 2009 and was quite strong throughout 2010 and the first half of 2011. Because the DCS business is primarily project based with an average nine month lag time from order book to recognized revenue, this strong order book translated into an excellent revenue year for 2011 with Asia’s revenue up over 4.5 percent from 2010.


Level instruments head for China

13/11/2012
Increased investments in manufacturing and greater automated production to fuel demand in emerging economies

Multiple advantages will fuel the continued dominance of non-contact level sensors in the global level sensors and transmitters markets. Overall, the market will make a recovery on the back of revived projects that were shelved or postponed during the economic recession.

However, economic turmoil in Europe is causing many multinationals to reconsider their investment plans. In contrast, emerging economies such as China and India are witnessing greater investment and increasingly automated production. The continuous investments in manufacturing facilities are expected to be a strong driver for the instrumentation market in China, in particular.

New analysis from Frost & Sullivan, Global Level Sensors and Transmitters Markets, finds that the global level sensors and transmitters markets earned revenues of $4,048.7 million (€3,186,52m) in 2011 and estimates this to reach $5,319.5 million (€4,188,06m) in 2018.

Positive growth in China

“Field instruments, such as level sensors and transmitters, are set to experience positive growth in China,” notes Frost & Sullivan Senior Industry Analyst V. Sankaranarayanan. “This will be due to rising investments in areas such as petroleum, natural gas, and petrochemicals.”

Non-contact level measurement, in particular, is expected to continue increasing due to the benefits these devices offer.

“Non-contact level measurements essentially ensure a contamination free-environment because there is no contact from the sensor, as found in other forms of level indication such as mechanical, capacitance or conductivity,” says Sankaranarayanan. “The non-contact nature of the level indication is also attractive to industries where the medium being measured is of a corrosive nature as found in the chemical/petrochemical industry.”

Overall, the restoration of health in end-user industries, along with a growing number of projects, will promote market growth. The establishment of new process plants, re-investment in plant renovation and modernisation, capacity expansions, and technology developments will further support the uptake of level sensors and transmitters, globally
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ABB & Zenith join forces for life sciences in China & India

28/09/2012
Combined expertise to help customers in China and India meet new industry regulations

ABB and system integrator Zenith Technologies have announced that they will work together to develop and implement automation solutions that will help life science customers in China and India meet new regulatory and product safety requirements.

Headquartered in Cork (IRL), Zenith Technologies is a leading Global Automation and MES Engineering company which focuses exclusively on the life science industry.

ABB will collaborate with Zenith to implement solutions based on ABB’s market leading System 800xA and Freelance automation systems, for the growing life sciences industry in China and India. ABB and Zenith will also deliver solutions that use ABB’s PAT (Process Analytical Technology) and MES (Manufacturing Execution Systems) technology. Increasing governmental regulations, and new requirements that mandate compliance with Food & Drug Administration (FDA) standards and other food safety regulations have made it imperative for life sciences companies in China and India to be able to accurately track products at all points in the manufacturing process to ensure high quality and safety.

“ABB’s field-proven automation solutions, combined with Zenith’s expertise in implementing systems designed to meet these validation requirements, will help our mutual customers in this region improve their overall process and product quality, and meet current and future regulations,” said Tobias Becker, head of ABB Control Technologies. “Our collective knowledge can help our customers better understand how these requirements impact their manufacturing process and what steps are needed to comply with them.


Photoelectric sensors collapse and rebound!

23/07/2012
Market for photoelectric sensors faces increasing demand for smart sensors and price pressure

The market for photoelectric sensors experienced a collapse and a dramatic rebound in the last three years.  The market is now back to the development behavior that we have seen in the past.  As the market is strongly dependent on the investment climate, the situation has recently worsened, but ARC still expects a rather positive development for the coming years.

The market for smart sensing in the area of photoelectric sensors refers to all sensors that expand the traditional capabilities of fixed measuring and switching.

“Photoelectric sensors have long been in a position in which there was simply no alternative, but now ultrasonic sensors as well as low-end vision sensors are targeting the same applications.  While photoelectric sensors are still price competitive, they also add value for end users with more functions,” says ARC Analyst Florian Güldner, the principal author of ARC’s Photoelectric Sensors Worldwide Outlook

Dependency on Investment Cycles Challenges Suppliers
The demand for sensing is increasing with overall demand for sensors rising faster than for industrial automation in general.  Still, the investment climate overshadows technological effects and trends from the plant floor.  Growth in photoelectric sensors is directly linked to the business cycle.

Automation demand is often supported by the spare parts business, modernization projects, and longer project lead times.  But sensor suppliers cannot count on these dynamics.  In contrast, the relatively high share of sales through distributors emphasizes the effects from investment as distributors empty/fill up their stocks at the beginning of a development.

Flexibility and the willingness to diversify are key characteristics of successful sensor suppliers.  Many are adopting a more solution-oriented business model targeted at measurement, quality control, or safety applications.

Is Smart Sensing a Benefit for the End User?
Smart sensors make the lives of machine builders easier as they reduce the number of suppliers and parts, and help to reduce engineering time.  Smart sensing includes photoelectric sensors, that can self-adjust to the environment, can be configured remotely, can house more than one sensing technology (light barrier, diffuse etc.), can be used for measuring and switching, and that help to detect errors such as a dirty lens or a broken cable.

With all these capabilities, sensors can help to make machines more flexible, shorten changeover times, and minimize planned and unplanned downtime.  Whether or not photoelectric sensors are smart is only important if there is the right connection to the rest of the automation architecture.  Here IO–Link offers a good solution.   However, the acceptance and awareness of IO-Link is still limited.  With technologies like IO-Link, photoelectric sensors are becoming part of the automation hierarchy.

Will Asia Help Suppliers Form Established Economies?
Asia is the fastest growing region in our study.  However, some trends are dampening the impact on sensor suppliers — locally produced machinery is often simple and requires limited, simple, and cheap switches.  Local producers that serve a large portion of the market, especially in China, are forced to focus on high volume, small margin sensors.

Sensor suppliers that focus on direct sales sometimes have difficulty in the Chinese market as the market is primarily served by distributors and thus the companies need to re-think their go to market strategy.  This can also impact their way of doing business because it is solution focused and based on close customer relationships.  These companies benefit from global end user customers that also produce in China, but have also adapted to the new market.

Profiles for the major suppliers for this market are included in this report.  Each profile reviews the company’s business, products, and services as it applies to this market.  Suppliers profiled include Balluff, Banner Engineering, Baumer Electric, Contrinex, Keyence, Leuze, OMRON, Pepperl+Fuchs, Rockwell Automation/Allen Bradley, Schneider Electric, SICK, Sunx, Yamatake.


China leads the way in distribution automation!

16/07/2012
Distribution automation, the ‘Darling’ of the Smart Grid to achieve $5 Billion

The Distribution Automation System market has become a top priority for smart grid utilities, across the board and around the world. In recent years, advanced metering infrastructure and demand response were the darlings of the industry, but now the utilities are turning their attention to improving efficiency and control in the distribution segment of the grid that lies between the substation and the meter.

Besides the tangible benefits of improving reliability and efficiency within grid operations, distribution automation system implementations and upgrades have another important attribute — the ability to deliver strong return on investment without requiring extensive consumer engagement or behavior change. In a nutshell, utilities are placing increased emphasis on adding greater intelligence and control capabilities to their distribution infrastructure.

Sovereign investment programs are focused on the expansion of capacity in emerging markets, upgrading of aging transmission and distribution infrastructure, and improvement of reliability and efficiency.

“The Electric Power Distribution Automation System market is being driven by the world’s continued demand for more energy as utilities are faced with the challenges of realizing a good ROI while providing a higher level of service to their customers. These challenges drive the need to conserve energy (specifically the energy lost in the distribution network), defer the building of additional generation facilities, and improve customer service,” according to Steve Clouther , author of ARC’s Electric Power Distribution Automation Systems Worldwide Outlook”.

Distribution automation system providers
The distribution automation systems market has a diverse group of players and market share leaders, even though the typical range of a distribution network is relatively short; i.e., a distribution network carries electricity from a sub-station to consumers.

The market leaders for worldwide distribution automation are subsidiaries and/or divisions of large international control companies with an expansive global presence. Collectively, the top ten vendors account for 71% of the 2011 worldwide distribution automation systems market.

China is “all In” on the Smart Grid
At the 2011 Smart Grid World Forum in Beijing (October 2011), China’s State Grid Corporation announced plans to invest $250 billion (€205b) in electric power infrastructure upgrades over the next five years, of which $45 billion (€37b) is earmarked for smart grid technologies. According to its three-stage plan, China will invest another $240 billion (€197b) between 2016 and 2020 (including another $45 billion (€37b) toward smart grid technologies) to complete the build-out of a “stronger, smarter” Chinese power grid.

China to be a driving force in distribution automation
According to the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) World Energy Outlook 2011, by 2015 China will overtake the US, and become the leader in total electric power generation capacity. And then, by 2035 China will consume nearly 70% more energy than the United States. With ex-plosive growth such as this, China leads the way in distribution automation.


Asia to be the new magnet for sensor manufacturers!

29/06/2012
Sensors to benefit from shift toward better automation

New and expanding applications, coupled with the shift to enhanced automation processes and controls, are restoring growth to the global market for proximity and displacement sensors, which suffered negative growth rates in 2009.

New analysis from Frost & Sullivan, Analysis of the Proximity and Displacement Sensors Markets, finds that the market earned revenues of $2,427.5 million (ca €1950m) in 2011 and estimates this to reach $3,048.1 million (ca €2450m) in 2018. The research covers inductive, photoelectric, capacitive, magnetic, ultrasonic and LVDT sensors.

“The need for better automation is expected to allow for the conversion from older and less sophisticated controls to state-of-the-art automation,” notes Frost & Sullivan Senior Industry Analyst V. Sankaranarayanan. “As a result, the number and range of sensors used in equipment is increasing.”

Due to the rising sophistication in manufacturing processes, end-users are demanding more functionality from proximity sensors. Advanced network technologies (CompoNet and IO-Link) and diagnostic capabilities are some of the technical advancements that are also anticipated to boost market prospects.

Growth in mature markets such as Western Europe and North America is expected to be slow. The potential for further growth is limited, as most industrial processes are already using proximity and displacement sensors. In contrast, Asia is becoming progressively more important due to surging production and automation.

“Production in emerging economies, such as China and India, is becoming increasingly automated,” explains Sankaranarayanan. “Robust economic growth in these regions is expected fuel the demand for proximity and displacement sensors.”

Proximity sensors find application in almost every industry (due to the importance of feedback), underlining the widespread consumer demand for them. In addition to China and India, growth opportunities are also surfacing in other smaller Asian countries that have embarked on a path of economic development.

Keys to success will be emerging network technologies, solutions instead of products, regional growth markets and a successful distribution strategy.

“It is important to offer more than just a sensor; market participants will have to focus on providing complete solutions,” concludes Sankaranarayanan. “Price pressures will continue to pose a challenge, so vendors will need to constantly advance on the technological front.”